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Space Art Gallery

International Space Station

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International Space Station
SOLD / Commissioned by NASA Launch Director, Michael Leinbach, during the initial stages of design development and construction of the International Space Station. To view the complete description about this piece link to "About The Art". Copyright 2000 Lucy West / All Rights Reserved. Contact Lucy West for information regarding image use.
Posted on March 6, 2010 Slideshow

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5 Comments

Reply Mario John Borgatti
5:23 PM on October 31, 2011 
I'm compelled to expand on my thoughts of this magnificent "International Space Station" painting. It represents a genre of art which captivated me early on and replays that wonderful period in my life into full view. Back then I, along with millions of young people, were fascinated by the scientific visionaries and the artists who rendered scenarios of extra terrestrial adventures. They filled the psyche with dreams and hope for the future and gave us a sense that anything was achievable if we put our minds to it.

Your exciting story, "Holding One of My Dreams," chronicles the culmination of one of those dreams and your reaction to the Shuttle Launch Directors invitation is in keeping with the thrill of that moment. Although it has been five months since that very special day you must still be in LOE!

Thank you for that link, I will investigate!

The Space Quest page is excellent!
Reply Lucy West Studios
4:03 PM on October 31, 2011 
Mario,
Thank you for Dr. David Livingston's link: http://thespace review.com/article/1040/1 . A great read! It motivated my searching for technologies that benefit mankind derived from NASA's space programs. Here's some wonderful examples that we earth dwellers have benefitted from:
http://ethemes.missouri.edu/themes/1744
Reply Mario John Borgatti
3:03 PM on October 31, 2011 
Lucy,

I totally agree with your assessment of the NASA Space Shuttle Program. It marks a brilliant time in our history in which the committed men and woman you refer to risked all to advance not only the cause of science but civilization as well. We owe them, along with the thousands of talented and dedicated individuals who made it happen, a debt of gratitude.

The "...some out there..." you refer to are unfortunately ignorant of the facts related to the return on the investment. I found a great article in "The Space Review" written by Dr. David Livingston which lays it all out and debunks any argument ever floated by the malcontents who claim the shuttle missions "weren't worth the end result." thespacereview.com/article/1040/1

I hope you're right about the future Lucy, and I hope that Mike Leinbach's words are prophetic.
Reply Lucy West Studios
3:06 PM on October 30, 2011 
Mario,

I appreciate your insights. I thank you for sharing your reflections.

I believe the space shuttle program has been one of biggest stepping stones mankind has ever created to carry us into the realities of our future visions. Men and women live in low orbit space now because the shuttle program was successful in its intended role. There were failures too, lives lost, tremendous funds spent, and there are some out there who believe the sacrifices made weren't worth the end result.

I believe in the shuttle program successes.

Every man and woman that strapped themselves to the commitments of their assigned missions and did not return home to us knew the risks they we agreeing to. That kind of bravery is necessary to make the colossal leaps that man is capable of. Most Americans who heard President Kennedy speak his historic ideals in realtime, "We choose to go to the Moon," understood the unique opportunity he presented. Those Americans who said, "Yes! We choose to go to the moon!" were part of the ground breaking steps that helped make our country leaders in exploration.

I state it again, I believe in the shuttle programs successes. The programs end was inevitable and now we will continue to move forward and focus on traveling further into the wonders of space. I know we will succeed. As Commander Kelly stated during the final launch of Endeavour - "It is in the DNA of this great country to reach for the stars and explore. We must not stop." As Mike Leinbach said to me on July 22, 2011, "While the immediate future is unclear, the journey will continue because exploration and curiosity are part of our soul. It will not stop. It cannot stop."




Mario John Borgatti says...
Lucy, after reading your "About the Art" description of this glorious painting I waxed nostalgic for the early days of NASA's manned space flight program. The cancellation of that endeavor not only ends an era of courageous and fruitful manned space exploration, but simultaneously the dreams and the pioneering spirit of future generations as well. What happened to us since President John F. Kennedy's, September 12, 1962, "We choose to go to the Moon." speech at Rice University in Houston, Texas?

Your painting is symbolic of President Kennedy's vision and those who responded to his challenge by venturing beyond their Earthly bonds and into the unknown. I can fully understand why NASA Launch Director, Michael Leinbach commissioned a work epitomizing that period from the dawn of the space age to it's apex. Especially an image which would remind future generations of what we are capable of achieving for the good of all humanity. And, he, could not have chosen a more worthy artist to interpret this golden age of space exploration.
Reply Mario John Borgatti
9:37 PM on October 28, 2011 
Lucy, after reading your "About the Art" description of this glorious painting I waxed nostalgic for the early days of NASA's manned space flight program. The cancellation of that endeavor not only ends an era of courageous and fruitful manned space exploration, but simultaneously the dreams and the pioneering spirit of future generations as well. What happened to us since President John F. Kennedy's, September 12, 1962, "We choose to go to the Moon." speech at Rice University in Houston, Texas?

Your painting is symbolic of President Kennedy's vision and those who responded to his challenge by venturing beyond their Earthly bonds and into the unknown. I can fully understand why NASA Launch Director, Michael Leinbach commissioned a work epitomizing that period from the dawn of the space age to it's apex. Especially an image which would remind future generations of what we are capable of achieving for the good of all humanity. And, he, could not have chosen a more worthy artist to interpret this golden age of space exploration.